Machu Picchu Peru

Machu Picchu Peru

 

Site: Historic Sanctuary of Machu Picchu

Location: Peru

Year Designated: 1983 

Category: Cultural

Reason: Machu Picchu is one of the most important archaeological sites in the world.

Machu Picchu is an Incan city surrounded by temples, terraces and water channels, built on a mountaintop. It was built with huge blocks of stone joined to each other without any mortar. Today it has been designated cultural heritage of humanity in recognition of its political, religious and administrative importance during the age of the Incas. 

Machu pichhu is tangible evidence of the urban Inca Empire at the peak of its power and achievement—a citadel of cut stone fit together without mortar so tightly that its cracks still can’t be penetrated by a knife blade.

The complex of palaces and plazas, temples and homes may have been built as a ceremonial site, a military stronghold, or a retreat for ruling elites—its dramatic location is certainly well suited for any of those purposes. The ruins lie on a high ridge, surrounded on three sides by the windy, turbulent Urubamba River some 2,000 feet (610 meters) below.

Scholars are still striving to uncover clues to the mysteries hidden here high in the eastern slopes of the Andes, covered with tropical forests of the upper Amazon Basin. Machu Picchu appears to lie at the center of a network of related sites and trails—and many landmarks both man-made and mountainous appear to align with astronomical events like the solstice sunset. The Inca had no written language, so they left no record of why they built the site or how they used it before it was abandoned in the early 16th century.

Landscape engineering skills are in strong evidence at Machu Picchu. The site’s buildings, walls, terraces, and ramps reclaim the steep mountainous terrain and make the city blend naturally into the rock escarpments on which it is situated. The 700-plus terraces preserved soil, promoted agriculture, and served as part of an extensive water-distribution system that conserved water and limited erosion on the steep slopes.

The Inca’s achievements and skills are all the more impressive in light of the knowledge they lacked. When Machu Picchu was built some 500 years ago the Inca had no iron, no steel, and no wheels. Their tremendous effort apparently benefited relatively few people—some experts maintain that fewer than a thousand individuals lived here.

In 1911 a Peruvian guide led Yale professor Hiram Bingham up a steep mountainside and into the history books as the first Western scholar to lay eyes on the “lost city” of Machu Picchu. While indigenous peoples knew of the site, Peru’s Spanish conquerors never did—a fact which aided Machu Picchu’s isolation, and preservation, over the centuries.

Today Machu Picchu is far from isolated. In fact it’s a must-see for any visitor to Peru and the draw that compels many to travel to that nation. Machu Picchu’s management challenge is preservation of the site while making it accessible to all those who hope to experience an incredible part of Inca history.

1. General Information

  • Machu Picchu means Old Mountain, taking its name from the location of the Incan citadel.
  • According to historians, the architectural complex was built in the 15th century, approximately, by the Inca Pachacutec.
  • Its exact location is in the Machu Picchu district, province of Urubamba, 70 miles northeast of the city of Cusco.
  • Machu Picchu was linked to the entire Inca Empire via the Qhapaq Ñan, the famous roads of the Incas.
  • Temperature range from a low of 43º F to a high of 70º F.
  • The citadel is divided into two areas: the agricultural area consisting of the terraces, and the urban section, which served administrative purposes.
  • The average altitude of the citadel is 8047 feet above sea level.
  • The mountains of Wayna Picchu and Machu Picchu are perfect for taking panoramic photos of the entire architectural complex.

 

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